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Lore v2 QT on Raspberry Pi

Hello,
 
To follow up to mindphuk's excellent piece on building the headless client on Raspberry Pi (https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6gkjrw/wip_blackpi_a_stake_device_based_on_raspberry/), I thought if anyone was interested I'd show you how to get the full QT version running on the Pi on the Jessie with Pixel desktop. This works and has been soak tested for several days now on a standard Raspberry Pi 3. I have since added some coins and it stakes a handful of times a day.
 
Running staking Lore clients paves the way for some of the future use cases of BLK utilising the Bitcoin 0.12 (and newer) core tech, including colored coins. So I'm going to leave this one going indefinitely to kickstart the number of Lore clients staking. It's certainly not mandatory but it will be good in the longer term to have a nice distribution of Lore staking clients.
 
The cross-compile which lets you create binaries for multiple platforms didn't work for the QT version on the Pi, so there is more to do than just running the binary unfortunately, as below. There are folks working on some much cleaner solutions than this for the Pi, with a custom front end, and where you won't have to do any mucking about. That is coming soon. In the meantime, if you enjoy a fiddle with such things, here's how to get this QT client working on your Pi.
 
These instructions assume you are starting from scratch with a completely blank OS.
 
Download Jessie with Pixel from: http://downloads.raspberrypi.org/raspbian/images/raspbian-2017-07-05/2017-07-05-raspbian-jessie.zip
 
Note they have since (August 2017) released a version called 'Stretch' which does not work with this guide. I'll see if I can come up with something new for that at some point and link to it here when I have. In the meantime the guide should work with the Jessie image above.
 
Unzip the file and extract the .img file to burn it onto Fresh SD card to boot from (to be safe, use 16GB or larger), using a tool like win32diskimager or Etcher.
 
Assuming you have keyboard/mouse and monitor plugged into your pi, boot it up and the Jessie Desktop will show.
 
Before we do anything else, you should increase the default swap size on the pi, as compiling certain libraries can exhaust the RAM and get stuck otherwise. To do this, launch a Terminal window and type:
 
sudo nano /etc/dphys-swapfile 
 
and Change the CONF_SWAPSIZE from 100 to:
 
CONF_SWAPSIZE=1024 
 
Exit nano with control + x to write out the file.
 
Then, run the following to restart the swapfile manager:
 
sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile stop sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile start 
 
Now, launch the browser and download the Lore 2.12 binaries for ARM here: https://mega.nz/#!k2InxZhb!iaLhUPreA7LZqZ-Az-0StRBUshSJ82XjldPsvhGBBH4 (Version with fee fix from 6 September 2017)
 
(If you prefer to compile it yourself instead, it is possible by following the instructions in the original article by Mindphuk just taking into account this is the newer version of the Lore client than when that was written (https://github.com/janko33bd/bitcoin/releases) and the versions of Boost and the Berkeley DB need to be the same as below.)
 
Double click the zip and extract the Lore binary files. Yes, at the moment they are all called 'bitcoin', not 'blackcoin' or 'Lore' - this is because the code derives from a recent bitcoin core implementation so this has not yet been updated. You can place these wherever you like.
 
In the Terminal window, change directory to where you put the binaries, e.g.:
 
cd Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel chmod +x * 
 
That marks the binaries as executable.
 
Now, we need the Boost libraries installed for any of the Lore binaries to work. The project was done with Boost 1.62.0. Unfortunately the Jessie repository only goes up to 1.55, so we need to download and build 1.62 manually on the device.
wget https://sourceforge.net/projects/boost/files/boost/1.62.0/boost_1_62_0.tar.gz/download tar -xvzf download cd boost_1_62_0 sudo ./bootstrap.sh sudo ./b2 install 
 
(This will take almost 2 hours. Have a nice cup of tea and a sit down.)
 
When I came to run the binaries, I found they couldn't find Boost. Running this command fixes that:
sudo ldconfig 
 
Now we are going to install the packages which aren't already included in the default OS installation which the binaries need in order to run:
sudo apt-get install qrencode libprotobuf-dev libevent-pthreads-2.0-5 
 
Now we need to install the Berkeley Database version 6.2.23. This is the version Lore v2 uses. Bitcoin still uses 4.8 which is 10 years old! This doesn't take too long.
wget http://download.oracle.com/berkeley-db/db-6.2.23.tar.gz tar -xvzf db-6.2.23.tar.gz cd db-6.2.23/build_unix ../dist/configure --prefix=/usr --enable-compat185 --enable-dbm --disable-static --enable-cxx 
 
I find this next section of the Berkeley instructions worked better just switching to root, which can be fudged by running sudo su before the rest:
sudo su make make docdir=/usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 install chown -v -R root:root /usbin/db_* /usinclude/db{,_185,_cxx}.h /uslib/libdb*.{so,la} /usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 
 
Now we're going to go up a couple of directories to where the binaries were:
cd ../.. 
 
Then run the client!
./bitcoin-qt 
 
And there you have it. Should hopefully end up looking a bit like this: http://imgur.com/a/eEHGa
 
Using the Bootstrap can save a while syncing. Download it at: https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6b3imq/blackcoin_bootstrapdat_up_to_block_1631800
 
Place the bootstrap.dat file into the ~/.lore directory.
 
Run ./bitcoin-qt again, it will say 'Importing Blocks' rather than 'Synchronising with Network'. My pi sync'ed fully in about 5-6 hours.
 
If you want peace of mind that Lore will always start on bootup into the Jessie w/Pixel desktop (i.e. after a power cycle), then you need to create a .desktop file in the following place.
sudo nano ~/.config/autostart/Lore.desktop 
 
And in it, enter the following (tailoring the Exec line below to the whereabouts of your bitcoin-qt file):
[Desktop Entry] Name=Blackcoin Lore Comment=Mining without the waste Exec=/home/pi/Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel/bitcoin-qt Type=Application Encoding=UTF-8 Terminal=false Categories=None; 
 
Power usage and payback time
 
After a good while leaving it going by itself, the CPU load averages got down to almost zero, all of the time. Idling, the Pi uses a bit less than 3 watts. This means it would take two weeks to use one 1Kw/h of electricity.
 
If you pay e.g. 12.5 cents a unit, that's what you'd expect this to cost to run in a fortnight. That's around $0.25 a month or $3 a year. Green and cheap and helping to secure the BLK network. I paid for the year's worth of electricity in 2 days staking with 25k BLK. Makes mining look silly, huh? ;)
 
Securing your Pi
 
With staking, your wallet needs to be unlocked and as such, the keys to your wallet are on the device. In a clean and newly installed environment as described above, and if you don't allow others to use your device and there is no other software or nasties running on it, there is no real cause for concern. However, there are some basic security precautions you can take.
 
Firstly, if you have enabled SSH and are playing with your pi across your LAN (or worse, the Internet), you should immediately change the password for the default 'pi' user (which is preconfigured to be 'raspberry'). Simply log in as normal, then type:
 
passwd 
 
You'll be prompted to enter the old and the new passwords.
 
Security by default
 
Your Pi is likely, by default, to not be exposed to incoming connections from the outside world because your router is likely generating a private address range for your LAN (192.168.x.x or 10.0.x.x or 172.x.x.x) which means all incoming connections are effectively blocked at the router anyway unless you set up a 'port forward' record to allow packets arriving on certain ports to be forwarded to a specific internal IP address.
 
As for accessing your Pi across the internet, if you have set up a port forward, this likely has security ramifications. Even basic old fashioned protocols have proven in recent times to have uncaught flaws, so it's always advisable to lock down your device as much as possible, and even if you only plan to access the Pi over your LAN, install a firewall to configure this. I used one called ufw, because it's literally an uncomplicated firewall.
 
sudo apt-get install ufw sudo ufw allow from 192.168.0.0/16 to any port 22 sudo ufw --force enable 
 
This allows just port 22 (SSH) to be open on the Pi to any device on my LAN's subnet (192.168.0.x). You can change the above to a single IP address if paranoid, or add several lines, if you want to lock it down to your LAN and a specific external static IP address (e.g. a VPN service you use). To find out what subnet your router uses, just type:
 
ifconfig 
 
and you'll see on the interface you are using (either hard wired or wifi) the 192.168 or 10. or 172. prefix. Change the above rule so it matches the first two octets correctly (e.g. 10.0.0.0/16 if you're on a 10.0. address).
 
You may already use VNC to access your Pi's desktop across your LAN, this uses port 5900. Add a line like above to lock it down to an internal address. It's not a good idea to expose this port to the wider world because those connections are not encrypted and potentially could be subjected to a MITM attack.
 
You can query the status of the firewall like this:
ufw status 
 
And of course, try connecting remotely once you change the rules to see what works. You should consult the official documentation for further options: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UFW
 
Back up & Recovery
 
There are again many ways to tackle this so I'll just speak about my basic precautions in this regard. Don't take it as a be-all-and-end-all!
 
The wallet.dat file is the key file (literally) containing all the private/public keys and transactions. This can be found in:
 
~/.lore 
 
You can navigate there using Jessie w/Pixel's own file manager or in a terminal window (cd ~/.lore). You can copy this file or, if you'd rather keep a plain text file of all your public and private keys, use the 'dumpwallet' command in the console. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'dumpwallet myfilename' where myfilename is the file you want it to spit out with all your keys in it. This file will end up in the same place you launch bitcoin-qt from.
 
The instructions earlier on, when running Lore for the first time intentionally left out encrypting your wallet.dat file because in order for the wallet to stake upon startup, it needs to have a decrypted key already. This isn't perfect, but after a power cycle, it would never stake unless you left it decrypted. So the best practice here is as soon as the wallet.dat file has left your device, i.e. you copy it to a USB stick for example, put it in an encrypted folder or drive (or both).
 
In Windows, one way is to use Bitlocker drive encryption for the entire drive. You should follow the instructions here to encrypt your flash drive before your wallet.dat is on there, and don't forget the password!!
http://infosec.nmsu.edu/instructions-guides/how-to-enable-bitlocker-to-go-for-external-hard-drives-and-usb-flash-drives/
 
On the Mac, I use a software package called Concealer to encrypt files I store on the Mac itself: http://www.belightsoft.com/products/conceale   There are almost certainly free packages with similar functionality, I have just used that one for years.
 
Either way, if you want to just make sure your USB drive is encrypted, you can do so in one-click in Finder before you put the sensitive files on it: http://lifehacker.com/encrypt-a-usb-stick-in-finder-with-a-click-1594798016
 
Note that these disk encryption methods may mean having to access the USB stick on a PC or Mac in order to retrieve the files in the event of a disaster. Be aware this may mean exposing them to more security issues if your computer is in any way compromised or someone nefarious has access to your computer. There are more 'manual' ways of backing up and recovering, such as literally writing down private/public key pairs which this guide doesn't go into, but may suit you better if paranoid about your setup.
 
Recovery
 
The wallet.dat file has everything in it you need to recover your wallet, or if you used 'dumpwallet', the file you saved out has all the keys.
 
Wallet.dat method: Install Lore as normal then replace any auto-generated wallet.dat in ~/.lore directory with your backup. If a lot of time has elapsed and many transactions have occurred since your backup, launch lore with:
./bitcoin-qt -rescan 
 
And if that doesn't do the job, do a full reindex of the blockchain:
 
./bitcoin-qt -reindex 
 
If you used the dumpwallet command, install Lore then place the file containing all the keys that you saved out in the same directory as bitcoin-qt. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'importwallet myfilename' where myfilename is that file containing all the keys. The wallet should automatically rescan for transactions at that point and you should be good to go.
 
There are a million ways to do effective security and disaster recovery, but I hope this shows you a couple of basic precautionary ways. There are discussions about better ways to stake without compromising too much security which are happening all the time and developments in this regard will happen in time.
 
In the meantime, feel free to comment with your best practices.
 
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On Proof: A Confession about Satoshi?

The monster paragraph below, which is titled "On Proof", was taken from a website/blog I found while searching for a paper authored by CSW. The site I found appears to be some sort of confessional-tell-all CV authored by CSW to prove his identify. The text doesn't prove anything about CSW's work in bitcoin if true, but its possibly relevant to his ability to design bitcoin, his overall genius, and credibility. I have no position on whether Craig Wright is Satoshi at the moment.
I have no information about whether the wall-o-text contains anything true, who runs the site I found, or what the site is exactly. However, the text-wall contains plenty of info about CSW that can be cross-checked with official records.
In addition to the text (the wall is his, not mine), I've provided a link to the site, taken and an imgur album of my screen-captures. Some of the pictures show the browser tabs I had open when they were taken for time-stamping purposes.
WARNING. There is a downloader thing on the site, and I'm not sure about the funky URL. Be careful if you do visit.
http://bvde.cba.pl/9178.html (Text below)
http://imgur.com/a/NCfdt
It seems that I have to do this every couple years and each time it is generally worse as I have added to the list. In recent months I have been causing trouble again and as such there are always those who choose not to believe me or to engage in an attack on my character as a solution to not addressing the issue at hand. Let us start with career and that I am the VP of GICSR in Australia. Other than using an email address at GICSR, I am listed on the board as a director. Next, I am a trustee with the Uniting Church Trust Fund and am otherwise involved with the UC. That is me on page two of the funds newsletter where I had been accepted in the appointment. I have shaved, but it is still me in the photo. My role at Charles Sturt University is noted below and I have staff ID 11293457 if you want to actually check that. On certifications. I hold the three platinum certifications GSE, GSE-Malware and GSE-Compliance from GIAC. I will add my SANS/GIAC certs. I have more than any other person globally (not a boast, it is a fact). This is 37 Certs from GIAC alone. Click the link if you do not believe me. The answer is not just to believe this, validate it. All up, with Cisco and others I have over 100 certifications. Now, do you really care if you believe the total? Not really, and does it matter, not really. Some of those will start to disappear as I cannot maintain them and actually have a life anymore. I have 27 recertification’s next year that I will do at a cost of over $11,000. I will let some lapse. Degrees and more I am not going to cover all of my degrees any more. I will not discuss more than post graduate and a list of the papers associated with my doctoral work and I will simply cover those related to my profession here. I will not discuss my role as a lay pastor or theology degree other than face to face and only whit those I choose to discuss it with. There is enough to know I am involved with the Uniting Church and I am not here to convert people. If you are an atheist, that is your choice and I will not try to sway you at all. The thing is, atheism is also a belief. It is not and cannot be proven with science and hence is in a way also a religion even if in the negative. I do not wish to debate this (unless it is face to face, I like you and there is wine involved). If you are not happy with my post graduate qualifications, adding undergraduate qualifications right down to the associate degree level will add little. Then, does my having an Associate degree in Science (Organic Chemistry, Fuel sciences) add anything to my role in digital forensics and information security. If you really want to know what these are, there are old posts that searching will eventually uncover. As for the bio and claim that I am “a perpetual student with numerous post graduate degrees including an LLM specializing in international commercial law and ecommerce law, a Masters Degree in mathematical statistics from Newcastle as well as working on his 4th IT focused Masters degree (Masters in System Development) from Charles Sturt University where he lectures subjects in a Masters degree in digital forensics. He is writing his second doctorate, a PhD on the quantification of information system risk at CSU.” Charles Sturt University The masters degrees from CSU are: MMgmt(IT) – Masters of Management (IT) MNSA – Master of Network and System Admin MInfoSysSec – Master of Master Information Systems Security MSysDev – Master of System Development (nearly complete… I am just running out of subjects to do at the University. I even needed to take one where I was the author of the text just to have the credit points). Next year I complete my second doctorate. I also have two other Masters degrees not from CSU (the 4 they note in the link are those listed above), a Masters in Statistics (Newcastle AU) as well as a Masters in Law (Northumbria, UK). I am also doing the SANS Masters degree and have one more thing to complete this. That will give me 2 doctorates, 7 masters degrees and 8 other degrees. It is not too difficult to check that I am enrolled in the MSISE at the SANS Technology Institute (Master of Information Systems Engineering). Other than having presentations on the site (see this link) it would be crazy for me to state this. I have 37 GIAC certifications (which is most of either of the STI masters degrees. If I was to misrepresent my status at SANS/GIAC, the ethics policy means I will lose them all. So, first it is simple to actually check AND I have too much to lose in lying. I do this every couple years. Here is a link to a past time I had to do the same. Northumbria University I completed a Masters in Law in a UK based University. This is: LLM Northumbria – Master of Law (International Commerce Law, Ecommerce Law with commendation). PG Diploma in Law My dissertation was on "Internet Intermediary Liability". I received a commendation. If you need to check, I had Student Number: 05024288 Newcastle University MSTAT – Master of Statistics I was student number 3047661 at the University of Newcastle here in Australia. My thesis that I wrote to complete this degree was on “The homogeneity of Variances”. I analysed and tested many of the common statistical methods used in homogeneity tests in statistics (such as the Levene tests). Why? The links are associated with universities and others, so it is not too difficult to check me out. I am not stopping you. The only thing I do not wish to discuss openly is my role with the Uniting Church. My theological belief is one of the few things that remains personal and more than the stuff the church posts publically about me (which I attempt to minimise) I will not discuss. If you believe that my trying to maintain one personal and private thing in my life means I am lying, believe as you will. It does not impact my chosen career in information security and nor does it detract from this. Contrary to the believe structure some hold, one CAN be a doctor of the church as well as a scientist. Religion and Science do not overlap and nor should one seek to make them do so. We can never prove nor disprove the existence of any religion or other spiritual belief structure. This is why I also preach tolerance. I believe I am correct as far as I can be (and that is about zero as the human mind is too small to comprehend the infinite in any extent and any person who tells you differently is a liar or a fool). I comprehend and believe in my way, others in their own. Is Islam, Catholicism, Judaism etc right? Yes and no. Am I right, yes and know. Basically, we see a small aspect of the infinite and that is all we ever will. We can be right and wrong at the same time and will never be completely right as we cannot hold the concept of an infinite in our heads (and I have studied large number theory). In a way, I hate having to do this each few years. In this, I have scratched the surface of what I have done and that leaves many in disbelief. That stated, I fail in humility for this as well as other reasons. On Sanity I guess that the final aspect of this is on sanity. I have been accused of being insane for doing all I do. To take a quote from one of my doctoral supervisors: “Craig, you have a doctorate, why on earth would you want to go through this again. It is insane.” I love study. I can do it and I am good at it. I do not need to do formal study, but I like it. I enjoy the structure. I like the process and it means that I do more. I do not watch sport (I do play sport but there is a distinction) and I do not watch TV. Formal study is MY form of relaxation. To those people (usually without degrees) who keep attacking me and saying I cannot have done this, I offer you the chance to validate all of it. Now, the answer is that you can do something. Instead of engaging in an exercise designed to cut down tall poppies and to attack those who have done something, why not do something yourself? I will (and have in the past) helped others. I will do this for nearly anyone (none of us are not perfect and that includes me). There are ways that anyone can study these days. In fact, I am more than happy to help all I can to have people achieve this. Instead of attacking the character of others you see as frightening (and this really is what this is about), how about you spend the time doing a qualification yourself? Really, my email is public. I keep offering, instead of attacking the accomplishments of others, add to your own. I offer this and from time to time, people take me up on it. This is, I offer to help others improve their education. Not for money, not for fame, but as I want to have a better aware and education world. In this, I also benefit as a more educated (practically) world is one that will have fewer (though always some) issues and which could be more tolerant. Certification and membership numbers A limited subset of certifications I hold is listed below: CISSP # 47302 (ICS)2 Certified Information Systems Security Professional ISSMP # 47302 (ICS)2 Information Systems Security – Management Professional ISSAP # 47302 (ICS)2 Information Systems Security – Architecture Professional CISA # 0542911 IS Audit and Control Association – Certified Information Systems Auditor CISM # 0300803 IS Audit and Control Association – Certified Information Security Manager CCE # 480 ISFCE – Certified Computer Examiner ISSPCS # 051 International Systems Security Professional Certification Scheme MCSA # 3062393 Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator MCSE # 3062393 Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer MCSE # 3062393 Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (Mail) MCSE # 3062393 Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (Security) MCDBA # 3062393 Microsoft Certified Database Administrator MIEEE # 87028913 Member IEEE AFAIM # PM133844 Associate Fellow Aust Inst. Management (lapsed now as I have been culling memberships – they cost too much to maintain) MACS # 3015822 Senior Member Aust Computer Society GIAC… NOT ALLL GSE-Compliance #0001 [Platinum] GIAC Security Compliance (GSE-Compliance) GSEC # 10506 [Gold] GIAC Security Essentials Certification (GSEC) GCIH # 06896 [Silver] GIAC Certified Incident Handler GCIA # 02913 [Silver] GIAC Certified Intrusion Analyst GCFW # 01891 [Silver] GIAC Certified Firewall Analyst GCWN # 01234 [Silver] GIAC Certified Windows Security Administrator GAWN # 00894 [Silver] GIAC Assessing Wireless Networks GCUX # 00587 [Silver] GIAC Certified UNIX Security Administrator GNET # GIAC .Net GSLC # GIAC Security Leadership Certification GHTQ # 00368 [Silver] GIAC Cutting Edge Hacking Techniques G7799 # 0039 [GOLD] GIAC Certified ISO-17799 Specialist (G7799) GCFA # 0265 [GOLD] GIAC Certified Forensics Analyst (GCFA) GSNA # 0571 [GOLD] GIAC Systems and Network Auditor (GSNA) GSAE # 00141 [Silver] GIAC Security Audit Essentials (GSAE) GLEG # 0006 [GOLD] GIAC Legal Issues (GLEG) GLEG Incorporates GIAC Business Law and Computer Security (GBLC) GLEG Incorporates GIAC Contracting for Data Security (GCDS) GLIT GLEG Incorporates GIAC Legal Issues in Information Technologies (GLIT) GLFR # 0016 GIAC Law of Fraud (GLFR) GREM # 0586 GIAC Reverse Engineering Malware (GREM) GPCI # 0086 GIAC Payment Card Industry (GPCI) GSPA # 0101 GIAC Security Policy and Awareness (GSPA) GLDR # 0101 GIAC Leadership (GLDR) GWAS # 0535 GIAC Web Application Security (GWAS) GIPS # 0036 GIAC Intrusion Prevention (GIPS) SSP-MPA # 0416 Stay Sharp Program – Mastering Packet Analysis (SSP-MPA) SSP-GHD # 0246 Stay Sharp Program – Google Hacking and Defense (SSP-GHD) SSP-DRAP # 0171 Stay Sharp Program – Defeating Rogue Access Points (SSP-DRAP) Papers / Publications: Peer Reviewed Papers Right now, I have a further 8 papers in peer review. The following are all accepted and/or published. 2012 (Accepted) 1. Wright, C. (2012, February). Hacktivism, terror and the state: The Importance of Effectively Enforcing Cyber Security Legislation. Paper to be presented at the 10th Anniversary National Security Australia Conference. 2011 2. Wright, C. (2011, December) Who pays for a security violation? An assessment into the cost of lax security, negligence and risk, a glance into the looking glass. Paper to be presented at the International Conference on Business Intelligence and Financial Engineering. . 3. Wright, C. (2011, December) Current issues and liability facing Internet Intermediaries. Paper to be presented at the International Conference on Business Intelligence and Financial Engineering. 4. Wright, C. (2011, December) Criminal Specialization as a corollary of Rational Choice. Paper to be presented at the International Conference on Business Intelligence and Financial Engineering. Wright, C. (2011, December) A preamble into aligning Systems engineering and Information security risk measures. Paper to be presented at the International Conference on Business Intelligence and Financial Engineering. 5. Wright, C. & Via, T. (2011, December) Modeling System Audit as a Sequential test with Discovery as a Failure Time Endpoint. Paper to be presented at the International Conference on Business Intelligence and Financial Engineering. 6. Wright, C. (2011) “Exploiting format Strings with Python” Hakin9 7. Wright, C. (2011) “More Exploits with Python” Hakin9 8. Wright, C. (2011, September)Of Black Swans, Platypii and Bunyips. The outlier and normal incident in risk management. Paper presented at CACS2011 Australia. 9. Wright, C. & Zia, T. (2011, July)Compliance or Security, what cost? (Poster)” Australasian Conference on Information Security and Privacy. 10. Wright, C. (2011) “A comparative study of attacks against Corporate IIS and Apache Web Servers” Sans Technology Inst, USA 11. Wright, C. (2011) “Rationally Opting for the Insecure Alternative: Negative Externalities and the Selection of Security Controls” Republished and extended Paper, Sans Technology Inst, USA 12. Wright, C. (2011) “Rationally Opting for the Insecure Alternative: Negative Externalities and the Selection of Security Controls” Republished and extended Paper, Sans Technology Inst, USA 13. Wright, C. & Zia T (2011)”Rationally Opting for the Insecure Alternative: Negative Externalities and the Selection of Security Controls” CISIS Spain 14. Wright, C. & Zia T (2011)”A Quantitative Analysis into the Economics of Correcting Software Bugs” CISIS Spain 2010 15. Wright, C. (2010) “Software, Vendors and Reputation: an analysis of the dilemma in creating secure software” Intrust 2010 China 16. Wright, C. & Zia T (2010) “The Economics of Developing Security Embedded Software” SecAU Australia 17. Wright, C. (2010) “The not so Mythical IDS Man-Month: Or Brooks and the rule of information security” ISSRE USA 18. Wright, C. (2010) “Packer Analysis Report – Debugging and unpacking the NsPack 3.4 and 3.7 packer.” Sans Technology Inst, USA 2009 19. Wright, C. (2009) “Effective Patch Management – Saving Time and Getting Better Security” MISTI USA 20. Wright, C. (2009) “Database Auditing” Testing Experience, Germany 21. Wright, C. (2009) “SaaS Security” MISTI USA 22. CISecurity (Multiple) (2009) CIS BIND Benchmarks” Centre For Internet Security, USA 2008 23. Wright C, Kleiman D & Sundhar R.S. (2008) “Overwriting Hard Drive Data: The Great Wiping Controversy” Lecture Notes in Computer Science (Springer Berlin / Heidelberg) 24. Wright, C. (2008) “Detecting Hydan: Statistical Methods For Classifying The Use Of Hydan Based Stegonagraphy In Executable Files” Sans Technology Inst USA 25. Wright, C. (2008) “Using Neural Networks” Google 26. Wright, C. (2008) “Ensuring secure data transfer and data sharing” DQ Asia Pacific 27. Wright, C. (2008) “Record and Document Destruction in a Digital World” IT Security World, USA 28. Wright, C. (2008) “Managing Security in a Global Company” IT Security World, USA 29. Wright, C. (2008) “A Quick and Nasty overview of finding TrueCrypt Volumes” Sans Technology Institute 30. Wright, C. (2008) “Exploring Data Visualisation” Strategic Data Mining 31. Wright, C. (2008) “Statistical Methods to Determine the Authenticity of Data” CACS2008, Au 32. Wright, C. (2008) “Text Data Mining, the future of Digital Forensics” Hex Journal USA 33. Wright, C. (2008) “Compliance, law and Metrics: What you need to meet and how you prove it” SANS ACT 34. Wright, C. (2008) “Current Issues in DNS” Sans Technology Inst, USA 35. Wright, C. (2008) “Advanced Methods to Remotely Determine Application Versions” NS2008 LV, USA 36. Wright, C. (2008) “An in-depth review of the security features inherent in Firefox 3.0 Compared to IE 8.0” iDefense, USA 2007 37. Wright, C. (2007) “The Problem With Document Destruction” ITAudit, Vol 10. 10 Aug 2007, The IIA, USA 38. Wright, C. (2007) “Requirements for Record Keeping and Document Destruction in a Digital World” Sans Technology Inst, USA 39. Wright, C. (2007) “Electronic Contracting in an Insecure World” Sans Technology Inst, USA 40. Wright, C. (2007) “The Problem with Document Destruction” IRMA UK (Republished) 41. Wright, C. (2007) “Ethical Attacks miss the point!” System Control Journal ISACA 42. Wright, C. (2007) “Where Vulnerability Testing fails” System Control Journal ISACA 43. Wright, C. (2007) “Application, scope and limits of Letters of Indemnity in regards to the International Law of Trade” Internal Publication, BDO Aug 2007 44. Wright, C. (2007) “UCP 500, fizzle or bang” Internal Publication, BDO July 2007 2006 45. Wright, C. (2006) “Port Scanning A violation of Property rights” Hakin9 46. Wright, C. (2006) “A Taxonomy of Information Systems Audits, Assessments and Reviews” SANS Technology Inst USA 47. Wright, C. (2006) “RISK & Risk Management” 360 Security Summit AU 48. Wright, C. (2006) “A QUANTITATIVE TIME SERIES ANALYSIS OF MALWARE AND VULNERABILITY TRENDS” Ruxcon AU 2005 49. Wright, C. (2005) “Analysis of a serial based digital voice recorder” Published 2006 SANS Technology Inst USA 50. Wright, C. (2005) “Implementing an Information Security Management System (ISMS) Training process” SANS Darling Harbour AU 51. Wright, C. (2005) “Beyond Vulnerability Scans — Security Considerations for Auditors” ITAudit, The IIA, USA 52. Wright, C. (2005) “PCI Payment Card Industry Facts” Retail Industry journal, July 2005 2001 53. Multiple Authors (1999) “Windows NT Security Step by Step” SANS Technology Inst USA 2000 54. Ashbury A & Wright, C. (2000) “DNS Security in Australia” Net Security, June 2000. 1999 55. Wright, C. (1999) “A Comparative analysis of Firewalls” in “The Internet Hot Sheet” ATT Sept 1999 Books / Book Chapters 1. Wright, C. (2008) “0123456789The IT Regulatory and Standards Compliance Handbook: How to Survive Information Systems Audit and Assessments0123456789” Syngress USA 2. Litchko, J; Lang, D; Hennell , C; Wright, C & Linden, M V (2011) ““0123456789Official (ISC)2 Guide to the CISSP(R)-ISSMP(R) CBK0123456789” CRC Press, ISC2 USA 3. Kleiman, D; Wright, C; Varsalone, V& Clinton, T (2007) “0123456789The Official CHFI Study Guide0123456789” (Exam 312-49) (Paperback)” Syngress, USA 2007 This book is used as a text for ITE-513 at Charles Sturt University 4. Multiple Authors (2009) “0123456789Cisco Router and Switch Forensics: Investigating and Analyzing Malicious Network Activity0123456789”, Syngress Press 5. Multiple Authors (2009) “0123456789Mobile Malware Attacks and Defense0123456789”, Syngress Press 6. Multiple Authors (2008) “0123456789Check Point NGX R65 Security0123456789” Syngress, USA This book is used as a text at Charles Sturt University 7. Multiple Authors (2008) “0123456789Mobile Malicious Code0123456789” Syngress, USA 8. Multiple Authors (2008) “0123456789Best Forensic Book0123456789” Syngress, USA In 2012 the following book will be published by Taylor Francis Academic press: SCADA Security. I am the author of the Forensic chapter Chapter 16: Forensics Management
submitted by veintiuno to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

(Updated) [Staking] Reddcoin Core client GUI wallet on a Raspberry Pi Model 3B

Intro

This thread is an update to my first Reddcoin staking tutorial that was written 7 months ago.
 
The reason for the update
My Reddcoin Core software crashed and became unusable. My Raspberry Pi 3B would lag and freeze, I couldn't stake anymore.
 
Instead of just redoing everything the same way, I wanted to see if I could improve on 3 points:
 
The updates
 
If you would like to tip me
Writing a tutorial like this takes time and effort; tips are appreciated. My Reddcoin address: RqvdnNX5MTam855Y2Vudv7yVgtXdcYaQAW.
     

Overview

 

Steps

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     

Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Snr5e8bzftI
This video shows how long it takes to start Reddcoin Core.   TL;DR:
     

Extra

Backup
Backup your wallet to prevent losing the RDDs in your wallet! There are two methods to backup, do both. Make new backups if you create a new receiving address!
 
 
   
Boot with only 1 USB drive plugged in:
Make sure only the USB drive (with the swap partition and data partition) is plugged in when you boot up your Raspberry Pi. This to make sure the swap partition (/dev/sda1) is recognized correctly.   If you boot up with multiple USB drives, Lubuntu might see the USB drive with the swap partition as the second drive (instead of the first drive), and ignore the 2 GB swap partition. If this happens, starting Reddcoin can render the Raspberry Pi unresponsive.
   
Connection issues If you have issues syncing the blockchain because you have 0 network connections, please follow the instructions in this thread.
   
Start Reddcoin Core easier
Run a shell script (.sh file), so you can start Reddcoin just by double clicking on an icon on your Desktop.
   
Minimization options
Adjust minimization options, so you can safely press on the X button (the close/exit button on the upper right corner).
   
RealVNC VNC Viewer (client) and VNC Connect (server): To remote connect to the Raspberry Pi, I use VNC Viewer ad VNC Connect from RealVNC.
 
   
Chromium as browser: The updates break Firefox, the browser crashes when you try to run it. Install another browser, Chromium, to solve this issue.
   
Updates / Upgrades
If Software Updater shows up and tells you that there is updated software available, do not install the updates using Software Updater. Use LXTerminal to update Lubuntu.  
     

Credits:

   
Credits in previous tutorial:
submitted by Yavuz_Selim to reddCoin [link] [comments]

Step by step in staking Redd with Raspberry Pi 3

Before I start, I would like to pay complete credits to these two guys :)
https://www.reddcointalk.org/topic/2679/reddcoin-staking-via-ubuntu-mate-on-raspberry-pi-3-model-b-march-2018 (most of my steps, if not all, are from this link)
https://github.com/joroob/reddcoin/blob/mastedoc/build-arm.md
All the steps I am writing is ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY, please don't try to skip it because I did, and it doesn't work.
step 1: get a Raspberry Pi B https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/#buy-now-modal
step 2: make sure you get proper power supply 5v 2A - the Pi will mine, it will need sufficient power. Regular USB samsung charger will not work.
step 3: get proper micro SD card (SanDisk for example) 32Gb++
step 4: USB + Mouse keyboard
step 5: flash micro SD card with Ubuntu MATE
Download Ubuntu Mate image: https://ubuntu-mate.org/raspberry-pi/
Download Etcher: https://etcher.io
After finishing downloading, use Etcher to write/flash the image on micro SD card
After this, your SD card contains Ubuntu MATE OS.
step 6: Place SD Card into Raspberry Pi 3 and start it up. You should be able to see Ubuntu OS! Congrats!
step 7: Connect to wifi or internet cable (internet is better and faster)
step 8: OPTIONAL - turn off UI OS, so that things will work faster
Open XTerminal:
sudo systemctl disable lightdm.service (to turn UI off) 
in case you want to turn UI on again, run this:
sudo systemctl start lightdm.service (to turn UI on) 
step 9: install all dependencies
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install git build-essential libqt4-dev libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler libtool autotools-dev autoconf libssl-dev libboost-all-dev wget pkg-config sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install db4.8 sudo apt-get install libminiupnpc-dev sudo apt-get install libqrencode-dev Reboot 
step 10: add additional RAM (sort of) in case the App need it, this is call "Create Swap file"
sudo fallocate -l 1G /swapfile sudo chmod 600 /swapfile sudo mkswap /swapfile sudo swapon /swapfile echo ‘/swapfile none swap sw 0 0’ | sudo tee -a /etc/fstab 
step 11: Build Berkeley Database
wget http://download.oracle.com/berkeley-db/db-4.8.30.NC.tar.gz tar xfvz db-4.8.30.NC.tar.gz cd db-4.8.30.NC cd build_unix ../dist/configure --enable-cxx make sudo make install 
step 11.5: Set BerkeleyDB path
export CPATH="/uslocal/BerkeleyDB.4.8/include" export LIBRARY_PATH="/uslocal/BerkeleyDB.4.8/lib" export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/uslocal/BerkeleyDB.4.8/lib/ 
step 12: Build Reddcoin Wallet
---download source code ---- only source from joroob/reddcoin will work because some stweak was needed for ARM CPU
cd ~ git clone https://github.com/joroob/reddcoin.git 
---build reddcoin ----
cd reddcoin ./autogen.sh ./configure --with-gui=no --disable-tests cd src make sudo make install 
If you finish this, you are in a great position!!!
step 13: Create reddcoin configuration file
cd ~ mkdir .reddcoin && cd .reddcoin nano reddcoin.conf rpcuser=YOUR OWN USERNAME, YOU DONT NEED TO REMEMBER THIS, MAKE IT AS LONG AS YOU WANT rpcpassword=YOUR OWN PASS WORD, YOU DONT NEED TO REMEMBER THIS, MAKE IT AS LONG AS YOU WANT 
step 14: Use bootstrap
(At this point, you had a running reddcoin daemon, now you can start staking. But syncing the full chain takes long time.)
cd ~/.reddcoin wget https://github.com/reddcoin-project/reddcoin/releases/download/v2.0.1.2/bootstrap.dat.xz xz -d bootstrap.dat.xz 
step 15: start the reddcoin daemon service cd ~/reddcoin/src ./reddcoind -daemon
After this, you can test if the daemon is working, by perform this command: ./reddcoin-cli getblockcount
step 16: if your app is not able to sync, it is probably the firewall issue with OS, run this to allow port 45444 (used by Reddcoin) and redo step 15
sudo iptables -I INPUT 1 -i eth0 -p tcp --dport 45444 -j ACCEPT sudo iptables -A OUTPUT -p tcp --dport 45444 -j ACCEPT 
step 17: open BEER and enjoy! This is a MUST or the daemon will stop working! I am not kidding!
step 18: Actually, i forgot to mention you need to execute this command for the wallet to stake:
reddcoind walletpassphrase $yourpassword 9999999 true 
ADDITIONAL REMARKS:
From my PC: I am using putty to execute the command, winSCP to monitor the file location on raspberry.
Moving Red Coins out of exchange really a big move, start with normal wallet, don't start with this tutorial :) Ever since I move my coins out of exchange, I am free from all of the ups and downs! Really!
So guys and gals, Redd On!
UPDATE 18 Mar: my first stake has arrived after 6 days staking :)
In case you want to tip me: RaF3TeWqgTzAdnaZQffnsxS74dag13zsAY
Edit 1: Format stuff
Edit 2: Add step 18 to execute staking command.
Edit 3: In case you don't want to compile the source code, you can download my compile version here: https://github.com/hieplenet/reddcoin/releases/tag/v2.0.0.0 (but doing this, you should be aware of the risk of me changing source code for my benefit - I don't change any thing, but you should be cautious, this is the internet :) )
submitted by hieplenet to reddCoin [link] [comments]

How to Mine BiblePay on Linux

This guide is outdated, please refer to:
https://wiki.biblepay.org/POBH_Setup
https://wiki.biblepay.org/PODC_Setup
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IMPORTANT - Evolution Upgrade:
Quick Start https://wiki.biblepay.org/Quick_Start
Evolution Upgrade Information https://wiki.biblepay.org/Evolution_Upgrade
Getting Started with Evolution https://wiki.biblepay.org/Getting_Started_with_Evolution
Generic Smart Contracts https://wiki.biblepay.org/Generic_Smart_Contracts
What is BiblePay Evolution? https://www.reddit.com/BiblePay/comments/bifvpk/biblepay_evolution_what_is_it/
Recommend 2GB RAM or can get stuck compiling (if 1GB RAM can use Swap File) Use Ubuntu 16.04
INFO
https://github.com/biblepay/biblepay-evolution/blob/masteBuildBiblePay.txt
INSTALL COMMANDS
apt-get install build-essential libtool autotools-dev automake pkg-config libssl-dev libevent-dev bsdmainutils apt-get install libboost-system-dev libboost-filesystem-dev libboost-chrono-dev libboost-program-options-dev libboost-test-dev libboost-thread-dev apt-get install libqt5gui5 libqt5core5a libqt5dbus5 qttools5-dev qttools5-dev-tools libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler apt-get install git apt-get install curl build-essential libtool autotools-dev automake pkg-config python3 bsdmainutils cmake sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install libdb4.8-dev libdb4.8++-dev git clone http://github.com/biblepay/biblepay-evolution prefix=x86_64-pc-linux-gnu cd biblepay-evolution/depends make -j4 # Choose a good -j value, depending on the number of CPU cores available cd .. ./autogen.sh #Note: if echo `pwd` does not return your working directory, replace it with your working directory such as /biblepay-evolution/ ./configure --prefix `pwd`/depends/x86_64-pc-linux-gnu make # See more here: #https://github.com/biblepay/biblepay-evolution/blob/mastedoc/build-unix.md 

SWAP FILE
NOTE: if server is 1GB RAM, before running last command "sudo make", set up a swap file
free #check if swap is 0 dd if=/dev/zero of=/vaswap.img bs=1024k count=1000 mkswap /vaswap.img swapon /vaswap.img free #check if swap is 1024 sudo make 

RUN COMMAND LINE
cd src ./biblepayd -daemon 
OR
RUN GUI
Your GUI program will be located in: /biblepay-evolution/src/qt
./biblepay-qt 
You can also run it in the background (to free up your terminal) if you call it with:
./biblepay-qt & 
To start mining, instructions are the same as for Windows: Go to Tools -> Debug Console
Execute this command (to start mining with 8 threads)
setgenerate true 8 
From there you can use all other commands such as getmininginfo, getwalletinfo, etc. Execute help command to get the list of all available commands.
Note: GUI will be built automatically only if you meet the requirements for qt library, i.e. make sure you ran this line before compiling:
sudo apt-get install libqt5gui5 libqt5core5a libqt5dbus5 qttools5-dev qttools5-dev-tools libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler 
BIBLEPAY is now Running!

SETUP CONFIG
Stop BiblePay and set up the config file to get starting nodes to sync with and enable mining:
./biblepay-cli stop cd ~/.biblepayevolution/ vi biblepay.conf addnode=node.biblepay.org gen=1 genproclimit=1 
Escape Key + : (Colon Key) + w + q + Enter (saves file and quits)

addnode --- adds a node to the list of nodes to connect to gen=1 --- turns on mining genproclimit --- sets number of threads to use when mining

Run BiblePay again and fully sync with network
cd ../biblepay-evolution/src ./biblepayd -daemon ./biblepay-cli getinfo 

USEFUL COMMANDS
./biblepay-cli help ./biblepay-cli getaccountaddress "" ./biblepay-cli getinfo ./biblepay-cli getmininginfo ./biblepay-cli setgenerate true 8 ./biblepay-cli sendtoaddress "insertAddressHere" 777 "" "" true ./biblepay-cli stop ./biblepayd -daemon top #CPU usage q to quit 

MINING THREADS: To change number of threads to use up for mining
a. Edit home/yourusername/.biblepayevolution/biblepay.conf file:
genproclimit=X 
and restart BiblePay -or- b. Menu >> Tools >> Debug Console >> Type command:
setgenerate true X 
(Replace X with number of threads Use top command to view CPU usage)

POOL
NOTE: To use the pool you must now use the external miner, not the wallet miner https://whitewalr.us/2019/biblepay-nomp-pool-mining.html
  1. Set up an account on pool website: https://pool.biblepay.org/
  2. Create Worker Username(s) - Workers tab >>> Add
  3. Enable pool and add Worker Username in ~/.biblepayevolution/biblepay.conf file, add these lines and save:
    pool=https://pool.biblepay.org workerid=insertWorkerUsernameHere
4. Restart BiblePay
./biblepay-cli stop ./biblepayd -daemon 
Setup Auto-Withdraw Navigate to Account >>> Account Settings >>> Verify your BBP Receiving Address >>> Click Authorize-Auto-Withdraws

UPDATE:

### Turn off/stop BiblePay
cd /home/yourname/biblepay-evolution/src ./biblepay-cli stop 

### Pull down latest Biblepay code and build it
cd /home/yourname/biblepay-evolution git pull origin master sudo make 

### Turn BiblePay back on and check version number
cd src ./biblepayd -daemon ./biblepay-cli getinfo ./biblepay-cli setgenerate true 8 

UPDATE IN ONE COMMAND:
./biblepay-evolution/src/biblepay-cli stop ; cd && cd biblepay-evolution/ && git pull origin master && sudo make && cd src && ./biblepayd -daemon && sleep 90 && ./biblepay-cli getmininginfo 
Note: the ";" says do this after, regardless of the outcome Note: && says do this after only if previous command finished with no errors

SPEED UP COMPILE:
To speed up the compile time, add -j4 or -j8 after make. This way it compiles using 4 or 8 threads instead of just 1.
./configure LDFLAGS="-L${BDB_PREFIX}/lib/" CPPFLAGS="-I${BDB_PREFIX}/include/" sudo make -j8 
Reference: http://www.linux-databook.info/?page_id=2319

RSYNC stop biblepay from your nodes compile on your fastest machine then rsync with your machines only src folder is required
rsync -avuz /root/biblepay-evolution/src/ [email protected]:/root/biblepay-evolution/src/ 
https://stackoverflow.com/questions/3299951/how-to-pass-password-for-rsync-ssh-command https://www.thegeekstuff.com/2008/11/3-steps-to-perform-ssh-login-without-password-using-ssh-keygen-ssh-copy-id/
people make cron jobs and rsync automatically

OUTDATED

Unofficial Bash Script
https://gist.github.com/anonymous/d1c1d35e3c8f67f5fb2e204479fa5c6b

Official Ubuntu Package
https://launchpad.net/~biblepay-official

Unofficial Ubuntu Package
https://www.reddit.com/BiblePay/comments/7rwqqs/unofficial_ubuntu_packages_available/

Unofficial Mine in One Line
https://www.reddit.com/BiblePay/comments/7ryuk1/mine_in_one_line/
NOTE: DONT RUN ON A COMPUTER WITH COINS -- THIS IS A CLEAN INSTALL SCRIPT

COMPILE WITHOUT GUI: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2042657.msg21878317#msg21878317 https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2042657.msg21878389#msg21878389
ADVANCED:

DOCKER IMAGES (NOTE: I havent tested these, use at your own risk) https://hub.docker.com/gagaha/biblepay/ https://hub.docker.com/cryptozero/biblepay-opt/
submitted by togoshige to BiblePay [link] [comments]

Gmail Phishing Scam is Worse Than We Have Thought. It is grabbing plain text gmail passwords without you logging in.

If you have a gmail account and you own bitcoins the attack is coming. Or has already hit. It has been mentioned before on reddit, but it didn't get the attention it deserves. If you use the same password on your email address and ANY bitcoin online wallet, they will clean out your account. Make sure to change your passwords.
To see if you have been attacked either follow this link or check recent activity in your gmail account https://security.google.com/settings/security/activity?pli=1 Mine was turning up places all over the world, France, Netherlands, Russia...it is likely a TOR. I will edit this post later with more details.
What's really powerful about this attack is that it seems to have found a weakness inside of google itself. Three of my friends and I have all fallen victim to this attack, but what is key here is that NONE of us have entered our password. It is grabbing the password from some internal communication via Google Docs and Gmail. And it is getting the password in plain text!!!!! Once it has the password it attempts to ransack your life for anything, especially bitcoins.
here's an image of the attack in gmail http://imgur.com/214JmJu
here's the original post in reddit - REMEMBER DONT CLICK ON LINKS - AND DONT POST LINKS OF THE ATTACK VECTOR http://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/1xpu64/bitcoin_phishing_scam_that_got_me_please_be_aware/
EDIT: YES INDEED I FOUND IT. IT IS A KEYLOGGER. I found it on my osx mac here Go to your finder, then go up to the toolbar and click Go. Then click "go to folder". Type in the following /Users/(your username)/Library/.KEYLOGGERFOLDER
my keylogger folder was called .sjp44 and there were 8 Unix Executable Files in there. Delete them. Then reset all your passwords.
submitted by bondzinho to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

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